Recipe: Mix marzipan, sugar and an egg white to make superb Passover macaroons

Makes 1 dozen

Crispy on the outside with soft insides, these almond macaroons are perfect for the Passover table. It’s a specialty of baker and novelist Louise Miller, pastry chef at the Union Club of Boston, a private club near the State House. Miller is the author of “The City Baker’s Guide to Country Living” and “The Late Bloomers’ Club”, novels on baking themes. Miller macaroons are made from three ingredients: marzipan, sugar and an egg white. Marzipan, by the way, is not marzipan; marzipan is smoother than marzipan. Break the marzipan into small pieces and beat it with the mixer with the sugar until the mixture resembles sand. Then add an egg white to obtain a firm and sticky dough. Use a small ice cream scoop to form mounds on parchment paper (spoon capacity is a generous tablespoon) or use a tablespoon to make the balls, tucking in the edges with your fingers. Garnish by pressing a slivered almond on top. When the macaroons are baked to a very pale golden color, slide the baking sheet with the macaroons onto a wire rack to cool completely. If you remove them too soon, the bottoms can stick to the parchment paper and leave you with hollow cookies. Miller brought these buttons to the public after interviewing her during a live event at WBUR’s CitySpace. These are the best macaroons I have tasted in years.

8 ounces marzipan, broken into marble-sized pieces
Sugar
1 egg white
¼ cup sliced ​​blanched almonds (for garnish)

1. Set the oven to 325 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In an electric mixer with the paddle attachment (or the whisk attachment if you don’t have one) on medium-low speed, mix the marzipan and sugar until the mixture looks a bit like wet sand. This may take a few minutes; don’t worry about over-mixing. Make sure there are no large chunks of marzipan left.

3. In another bowl, whisk the egg white with a fork to break it up. Pour it into the marzipan mixture and beat until it is completely incorporated and the mixture forms a sticky, slightly stiff dough.

4. Using a small ice cream scoop or tablespoon, shape the dough into balls the size of a heaped tablespoon. Place them on the baking sheet about 2 inches apart. Sprinkle the top of each with a slivered almond.

5. Bake the macaroons for 22 to 25 minutes, flipping the baking sheet from back to front halfway through cooking, or until the outside looks dry and the macaroons are crisp. a very pale gold. The bottoms will brown before the tops. If you find the bottoms are getting too brown, slide another baking sheet under the first.

6. Leave the macaroons on the baking sheet. Place the sheet on a wire rack for 30 minutes, or until the macaroons are cool. If you try to pull them out too quickly, the bottom will stick to the parchment paper, as well as the inside, leaving you with empty shells.

7. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for several days, or for a week in the refrigerator.

Sheryl Julian. Adapted from Louise Miller

Makes 1 dozen

Crispy on the outside with soft insides, these almond macaroons are perfect for the Passover table. It’s a specialty of baker and novelist Louise Miller, pastry chef at the Union Club of Boston, a private club near the State House. Miller is the author of “The City Baker’s Guide to Country Living” and “The Late Bloomers’ Club”, novels on baking themes. Miller macaroons are made from three ingredients: marzipan, sugar and an egg white. Marzipan, by the way, is not marzipan; marzipan is smoother than marzipan. Break the marzipan into small pieces and beat it with the mixer with the sugar until the mixture resembles sand. Then add an egg white to obtain a firm and sticky dough. Use a small ice cream scoop to form mounds on parchment paper (spoon capacity is a generous tablespoon) or use a tablespoon to make the balls, tucking in the edges with your fingers. Garnish by pressing a slivered almond on top. When the macaroons are baked to a very pale golden color, slide the baking sheet with the macaroons onto a wire rack to cool completely. If you remove them too soon, the bottoms can stick to the parchment paper and leave you with hollow cookies. Miller brought these buttons to the public after interviewing her during a live event at WBUR’s CitySpace. These are the best macaroons I have tasted in years.

8 ounces marzipan, broken into marble-sized pieces
Sugar
1 egg white
¼ cup sliced ​​blanched almonds (for garnish)

1. Set the oven to 325 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In an electric mixer with the paddle attachment (or the whisk attachment if you don’t have one) on medium-low speed, mix the marzipan and sugar until the mixture looks a bit like wet sand. This may take a few minutes; don’t worry about over-mixing. Make sure there are no large chunks of marzipan left.

3. In another bowl, whisk the egg white with a fork to break it up. Pour it into the marzipan mixture and beat until it is fully incorporated and the mixture forms a sticky, slightly stiff dough.

4. Using a small ice cream scoop or tablespoon, shape the dough into balls the size of a heaped tablespoon. Place them on the baking sheet about 2 inches apart. Sprinkle the top of each with a slivered almond.

5. Bake the macaroons for 22 to 25 minutes, flipping the baking sheet from back to front halfway through cooking, or until the outside looks dry and the macaroons are crisp. a very pale gold. The bottoms will brown before the tops. If you find the bottoms are getting too brown, slide another baking sheet under the first.

6. Leave the macaroons on the baking sheet. Place the sheet on a wire rack for 30 minutes, or until the macaroons are cool. If you try to pull them out too quickly, the bottom will stick to the parchment paper, as well as the inside, leaving you with empty shells.

7. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for several days, or for a week in the refrigerator.Sheryl Julian. Adapted from Louise Miller